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WASHINGTON (AP) D.C. voting rights advocates say House Speaker John Boehner (BAY'-nuhr) is violating his own small-government principles by meddling in local affairs. About two dozen protesters held a tea party-style demonstration outside Boehner's Capitol Hill home this morning. They wore colonial-style hats and chanted, "Don't tread on D.C."

WASHINGTON (AP) Bill Monroe, who hosted the long-running Washington political television show "Meet the Press" for nearly a decade in the late 1970s and early 1980s, has died. A New Orleans-based television station he worked for, WDSU, said Monroe died today at a nursing home in suburban Washington. He was 90.

WASHINGTON (AP) A new gallery opening in Washington will show figures of all the U.S. presidents together in the nation's capital for the first time. Madame Tussauds wax museum opens a $2 million revamped attraction today. It hopes to increase its appeal by pushing presidents over pop stars.

(Copyright 2011 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)

This post was updated at 5:20 p.m., Feb. 17, 2011.

WAMU 88.5

'Historic Landmark' Status Complicates Corcoran Renovations

Plans by George Washington University to renovate the Corcoran Gallery of Art may be thrown for a loop after D.C.'s historic preservation board designated much of the interior of the building as a historic landmark.

NPR

In This Museum, Visitors Can Eat At The Exhibits

The Southern Museum of Food and Beverage in New Orleans chronicles the eats and drinks of the Southern states. And it may be one of the only museums where visitors can imbibe while viewing exhibits.
NPR

Staten Island Candidates Avoid Talk Of Eric Garner Case

In the New York Congressional district where an an unarmed black man died at the hands of police last year, neither candidate for a special congressional election is using the death to score points.
NPR

As Health Apps Hop On The Apple Watch, Privacy Will Be Key

The notion of receiving nutrition advice from artificial intelligence on your wrist may seem like science fiction. But health developers are betting this kind of behavior will become the norm.

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