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D.C. To Assess Low HPV Completion Rates Among Students

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The vaccine is shown to protect against the types of HPV that cause most cervical cancers, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Of the more than 1,100 sixth-grade girls in D.C. this year, just 87 have completed their three shots. Almost twice that number have begun -- but not completed -- the series. And more than five times that number have not had any shots and not submitted waivers asking to "opt out" of the program.

Dr. LaQuandra Nesbitt with the D.C. Department of Health says students recieve information when they register for school, and they haven't looked into why students aren't completing the series.

She says all this while they've focused on parental outreach. Now the health department will begin evaluating the program to see if it needs to shift strategy.

"Part of that evaulation will help us determine whether or not it's effective to do an outreach program targeted just at the adolescent girls for whom the vaccine is required in addition to their parents," Nesbitt says.

Those findings should be available by the beginning of the next academic year.

NPR

'Game Of Thrones' Evolves On Women In Explosive Sixth Season

The sixth season of HBO's Game of Thrones showed a real evolution in the way the show portrays women and in the season finale, several female characters ascended to power. NPR's Kelly McEvers talks to Glen Weldon from NPR's Pop Culture Happy Hour and Greta Johnsen, host of the Nerdette podcast, about the show.
NPR

In Quest For Happier Chickens, Perdue Shifts How Birds Live And Die

Perdue Farms, one of the largest poultry companies in the country, says it will change its slaughter methods and also some of its poultry houses. Animal welfare groups are cheering.
WAMU 88.5

Jonathan Rauch On How American Politics Went Insane

Party insiders and backroom deals: One author on why we need to bring back old-time politics.

WAMU 88.5

Episode 5: Why 1986 Still Matters

In 1986, a federal official issued a warning: If Metro continued to expand rapidly, the system faced a future of stark choices over maintaining existing infrastructure. Metro chose expansion. We talk to a historian about that decision. We also hear from a former Metro general manager about the following years, and from an Arlington planner about measuring how riders are responding to SafeTrack.

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