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RICHMOND, Va. (AP) Drivers who run from police will not have to fear losing their vehicles. A Senate committee voted to kill a bill that would have required criminals who elude police to forfeit their vehicles. Sen. John Edwards of Roanoke said there were too many problems with the bill, and that legislators feared "uneven results."

RICHMOND, Va. (AP) A Senate subcommittee has killed a bill to allow individuals who feel they are in danger to use deadly force against intruders. Democratic Sen. Roscoe Reynolds of Henry County said the bill was not necessary because supporters have not been able to show anyone has ever been indicted or sued for killing an intruder.

ROANOKE, Va. (AP) An advocacy group claims in a series of lawsuits that Radford University, a half-dozen Roanoke area shopping malls and two hotels fail to provide adequate facilities for disabled people. The Roanoke Times reports that the lawsuits are among nearly 200 brought nationwide by the plaintiffs.

(Copyright 2011 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)

This post was updated at 3:15 p.m.

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