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ANNAPOLIS, Md. (AP) A state commission on transportation funding is recommending Maryland raise $800 million more annually for infrastructure. The panel says about $600 million should be raised in new revenue and that could be leveraged for another $200 million in bond sales.

WASHINGTON (AP) Former Prince George's County Executive Jack Johnson has been indicted on corruption charges. The eight-count indictment handed up Monday describes a wide-ranging pay-for-play scheme under which Johnson is accused of enriching himself for favors to developers and a liquor store owner.

COLLEGE PARK, Md. (AP) Maryland football will launch its first season under coach Randy Edsall with a night game at home against Miami on Labor Day. The Sept. 5 matchup against the Hurricanes is the first of four straight home games for the Terrapins, who will also face Notre Dame at FedEx Field on Nov. 12.

(Copyright 2011 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)

This post was updated at 5:43 p.m.

NPR

A Compelling Plot Gives Way To Farce In Franzen's Purity

The new novel reveals sharp observations and a great, sprawling story. But critic Roxane Gay says the book gets bogged down with absurdly-drawn characters and misfired critiques of modern life.
NPR

Huge Fish Farm Planned Near San Diego Aims To Fix Seafood Imbalance

The aquaculture project would be the same size as New York's Central Park and produce 11 million pounds of yellowtail and sea bass each year. But some people see it as an aquatic "factory farm."
WAMU 88.5

Europe's Ongoing Migrant And Refugee Crisis And The Future Of Open Borders

The Austria-Hungary border has become the latest pressure point in Europe's ongoing migrant crisis. An update on the huge influx of migrants and refugees from the Middle East and Africa and the future of open borders within the E.U.

WAMU 88.5

Environmental Outlook: How to Build Smarter Transportation And More Livable Cities

A new report says the traffic in the U.S. is the worst it has been in years. Yet, some urban transportation experts say there's reason to be optimistic. They point to revitalized city centers, emerging technology and the investment in alternative methods of transportation. A conversation about how we get around today, and might get around tomorrow.

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