D.C. Food Workers Survey Reveals Low Pay, Racial Disparity | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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D.C. Food Workers Survey Reveals Low Pay, Racial Disparity

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A report on restaurants in D.C. show that 11 percent of D.C. food workers, even with tips, are not earning the minimum wage. Also, 80 percent of the most visible jobs go to whites.
Patrick Madden
A report on restaurants in D.C. show that 11 percent of D.C. food workers, even with tips, are not earning the minimum wage. Also, 80 percent of the most visible jobs go to whites.

According to a survey by the nonprofit Restaurant Opportunities Center United, 11 percent of D.C. food workers, even when tips are factored in, are not earning the minimum wage. Ninety percent, the report found, do not receive any paid sick days.

There is also a striking racial disparity. The report found that 80 percent of the most visible jobs go to whites, while two-thirds of the so called "back of the house" jobs like food running and dishwashing were filled by either blacks or Latinos.

To address these problems the report recommends increasing the minimum wage and mandating paid sick days for all employees.

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