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VDOT Ramp Construction Raises Concerns

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More than 6,000 people will work at the Washington Headquarters Service, which is currently under construction on Alexandria's West End.
Michael Pope
More than 6,000 people will work at the Washington Headquarters Service, which is currently under construction on Alexandria's West End.

Many elected officials are praising a recent decision by the Virginia Department of Transportation to construct a new ramp from the HOV lane into a massive new building currently under construction. But Delegate Charniele Herring says it's not quite time to celebrate.

"I'm the Debbie Downer because we don't know the facts. We don't know if VDOT plans to take the ramp right through the Winkler Preserve," Herring says.

Winkler is the nature preserve Herring and others fought to protect last year. She says VDOT's decision to construct a new ramp has reopened that debate. And she's not the only one calling for restraint -- Fairfax County Lee District Supervisor Jeff McKay is too.

"It's not something you declare victory for the region on because it's still an incomplete project. If you are going to do HOT lanes on 395 you have to take them into the district," McKay says.

But that's not going to happen anytime soon. Now that VDOT has changed course, the HOT lanes will stop at the Beltway.

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