Maryland Residents React To State Of The State | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Maryland Residents React To State Of The State

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Courtney Collins

Maryland Governor Martin O'Malley's passionate State of the State address challenged both lawmakers and citizens to move ahead, despite budget constraints.

"Notwithstanding the limitations of this year's budget, all that we need to build a better future is right here," O'Malley says.

O'Malley focused his State of the State address on job creation and retention for the state of Maryland.

He tied that in with education and the environment but he also made the point that something as simple as building a more reliable power grid could provide countless jobs.

Holding utilities accountable through new legislation is something O'Malley is obviously passionate about.

"How long do you want to wait in the cold and the dark for deregulated markets to turn the electric back on?" he asks.

While he didn't hear O'Malley's speech firsthand, small-business owner and Maryland resident Sean Adams thinks the governor has the right idea.

"I know he feels for the young folks, so I'd like to think that he's really doing his best," Adams says.

When it comes to creating jobs, Adams says, in his opinion, more job training for high school and college aged students would make a world of difference.

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