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Metro Unveils Memorial For Employees Killed On The Job

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Jeanice McMillan's name is one of 26 names engraved on the memorial at Metro Center Station.
Elliott Francis
Jeanice McMillan's name is one of 26 names engraved on the memorial at Metro Center Station.

This week, friends and family of Metro employees killed on the job dedicated a new memorial honoring their loved ones.

The 12-foot-tall black granite pylon stands in the center of the upper platform of the Metro Center station. The names of 26 employees are engraved on the tower in tribute, including Janice McMillan -- the train operator killed the collision of two Red Line Metro trains back in the summer of 2009.

Her brother, Vernard McMillan, says while he appreciates the tribute, he's concerned about what's been done to correct the problem which killed his sister and eight others.

"Nothing has changed. It could happen again today...Everybody's working on a plan, but it's been a year and a half. Come on. Yes, it definitely honors her memory. Closure? Of course not," McMillan says.

The transit agency has established a scholarship fund to aid dependents of employees who've died while on the job.

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