WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

New System Could Make Licensing Easier For Saltwater Anglers

Play associated audio

The Department of Natural Resources says it's hoping to install a new system that would make it easier for anglers to obtain a saltwater fishing license in the state of Maryland.

On the Eastern Shore, there's only a few places where saltwater anglers can get their required fishing license: one government building, one retail store or the state's wildlife license Web site. So, when Natural Resources officials announced their hope to install a new streamlined system called COMPASS into bait-and-tackle shops all over the region, many in the fishing community were pleased they could soon pick up their license while they were picking up prawns and worms.

But others are quick to point out that the Department of Natural Resources is only trying to ease the licensing process because it's now a new requirement for everyone to have one.

A federal database law that went into effect on Jan. 1 requires a license for anyone who wants to fish in the Atlantic Ocean or the Coastal Bays.

Department of Natural Resources officials say COMPASS could be up and running by summer.

WAMU 88.5

Remains In Jamestown Linked To Early Colonial Leaders

Scientists from the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History and The Jamestown Rediscovery Foundation say they've identified four men buried in the earliest English church in America.
WAMU 88.5

The Democracy Of The Diner

Whether the decor is faux '50s silver and neon or authentic greasy spoon, diners are classic Americana, down to the familiar menu items. Rich, poor, black, white--all rub shoulders in the vinyl booths and at formica counters. We explore the enduring appeal and nostalgia of the diner.

WAMU 88.5

D.C. Council Member David Grosso

D.C. Council Member and Chair of the Committee on Education David Grosso joins us to discuss local public policy issues, including the challenges facing D.C. Public Schools.

NPR

Researchers Warn Against 'Autonomous Weapons' Arms Race

Already, researcher Stuart Russell says, sentry robots in South Korea "can spot and track a human being for a distance of 2 miles — and can very accurately kill that person."

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.