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WTU Pushes To Change Teacher Evaluation System

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The newly elected president of the Washington Teachers' Union, Nathan Saunders, says after speaking to teachers, his top priority will be changing the way they are evaluated.

The more than 400 teachers present at a union meeting this week raised concerns which included their relationship with principals, professional development but especially the teacher evaluation system called IMPACT.

Shakira Oliver-Kee teaches math and science at Brightwood Education Campus in Northwest D.C.

"It's a one-size-fits-all method, and it's very subjective," she says.

Oliver-Kee says she's recieved good evaluations, but more than 150 teachers were fired for poor evaluations last year. This year more than 700 teachers and staff members could be fired if they don't improve.

IMPACT doesn't need union consent.

Saunders says he's going to keep pushing until there's a change.

"I believe that eventually this mammoth monstrosity called IMPACT -- structured the way it's currently structured -- will be brought down," he says.

The WTU will present Mayor Vincent Gray's transition team with a report in two weeks.


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