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Sarles Here To Stay; Now Things Get Complicated

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Richard Sarles takes the oath of office as Metro's new, permanent general manager.
David Schultz
Richard Sarles takes the oath of office as Metro's new, permanent general manager.

Metro made Richard Sarles its new permanent general manager this week, after he'd been serving in the position on a temporary basis for the past year. But his job may become more difficult now that he's here to stay.

When Sarles first came aboard as interim general manager, he made a point of airing some of Metro's dirty laundry. He took a survey of employees' attitudes toward safety and he began issuing a monthly vital signs report, which wasn't always glowing.

Sarles could do that sort of thing without worrying about internal Metro politics because he was only supposed to be here for one year.

But that didn't happen, and now Sarles is here for the long haul. However, he says hes not going to start hiding unflattering information.

"You can't keep those things secret. It'll come out and it will probably come out in ways that aren't true," he says. "And frankly, frankly, that kind of information helps everyone realize what the challenges are and what we have to do to make them better."

Sarles will be leading Metro for at least the next three years. He signed a contract worth just over $1 million.

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