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Md. Casino Breaks Ground After Years Of Controversy

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By Courtney Collins

After a two-year legal battle, developers in Maryland are finally able to break ground on the state's newest and largest casino at Arundel Mills Mall in Anne Arundel County.

"Somebody in Charleston, West Virginia, who has a casino said it would be a cold day in hell and hell would freeze over before there would be a groundbreaking. Well, hell froze over last night, and we're breaking ground," David Cordish says.

Cordish's development company started ceremonial construction Thursday on its new casino.

It's a project surrounded by controversy, after owners at Laurel Park racing track tried to get the casino built there, a plan originally supported by Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley. At this point, however, Lt. Governor Anthony Brown says it's time to move ahead.

"The residents of Anne Arundel County, a majority said that they support the proposal. So at this point, we look forward, we build this facility, we create jobs," Brown says.

Cordish expects the casino construction to wrap up by the end of the year. He says the project will create 4,000 jobs.


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