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Arlington Co. Dealing With Rise In Homeless Single Adults

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Communities across the country are busy this week conducting their annual count of the number of homeless people who out on the streets.

Volunteers for Arlington Street People's Assistance Network, or A-SPAN, are handing out soup and sandwiches to the homeless at Oakland Park -- something they do every single day of the year.

But Thursday night, A-SPAN staffers were also taking aside many who came for food to record their names, ages and answers to basic questions.

"Any physical disabilities?" Case Manager Katherine Brinkley asks one man.

The snowy conditions makes it a bit harder to find some homeless people who regularly stay at outdoor encampments. Some head to the county shelter, but some find shelter elsewhere.

A-SPAN's executive director, Kathy Sibert, says while Arlington has done a great job preventing families with children from living without shelter, it needs to find a way to also focus on single adults.

"The number of single adults living on the streets of Arlington has jumped 30 percent in the last two years," she says.

Last year Arlington County documented 531 people living on its streets. This year's count won't be officially released for a few months.

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