WAMU 88.5 : News

MARC Lines Delayed, Expected To Be Restored Friday

Play associated audio

By Sam Greeenspan

MARC train riders may have experienced some delays Thursday, but at Baltimore's Penn Station, the commute wasn't the only source of some riders' frustration. The biggest hassle wasn't getting there -- it was getting there and finding out that it was all for nothing.

"I stayed in Baltimore last night because of the snow. I figured it'd be easier to get here from two blocks away from the courthouse than getting down here this morning," says Greg, from Perryville, Md.

Greg withheld his last name because he's serving on a jury in Baltimore.

"Since courts are closed, I'm trying to get back home...tomorrow I'll probably drive," he says.

The Brunswick and Camden lines were completely snowed out Thursday, though the Penn line is operating under a limited schedule. The MTA has been able to keep the Penn line running because of a robust winter weather plan that includes vehicle inspections, hiring snow-removal contractors and deploying more snowplows and salt trucks along the rails.

The MTA expects a full recovery of all of their services by Friday.

"Full MARC services and schedules will be restored on the Penn, Camden and Brunswick lines tomorrow morning," says MTA spokesman David Clark.

NPR

'Neither Snow Nor Rain' Celebrates History Of U.S. Postal Service

NPR's Robert Siegel talks with author Devin Leonard whose new book, Neither Snow Nor Rain, celebrates the history of the U.S. Postal Service.
WAMU 88.5

Should Local Restaurants Retire The Phrase, "Farm To Table?"

Where does Washington restaurant food really come from? Kojo explores how the phrase "farm to table" is used and discusses whether it should be retired altogether.

WAMU 88.5

The Results Of Tuesday's Indiana Primaries

Guest host Lisa Desjardins talks with NPR's Ron Elving about what the results of Tuesday's primaries in Indiana mean for the 2016 presidential race.

NPR

China Investigates Search Engine Baidu After Student Dies Of Cancer

A college student accused China's largest search engine, Baidu, of misleading him to a fraudulent cancer treatment. He died in April.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.