WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

'Consolidation:' Buzzword In Cutting Maryland Budgets

Play associated audio

In Maryland, with the state and local governments facing rising budget deficits, "consolidation" has become one of the most discussed ways to cut costs.

In his budget proposal, Gov. Martin O'Malley relies on consolidation in several departments to cut costs, including a call to merge together all the state transportation department's police forces.

Such moves will save money in the long term, but in the short term, consolidation in government often costs money.

In Montgomery County, leaders want to merge together parts of the county's recreation department and the Maryland-National Capital Park and Planning Commission. The moves deal with permits for athletic fields and how children can sign up for sports programs. The changes would cost $200,000, according to one county council member. In addition, studies into such moves can also be expensive according to county Council Member George Leventhal.

"In order to achieve a relatively small consolidation and efficiency, we had to appoint a 30-member task force. That's a fact -- that's not a joke," he says.

Consolidation will become more prominent in the county in the coming years, as a report to be released in the coming months is expected to call for drastic mergers among county agencies.

MD Governor's Budget Proposal, FY2012
NPR

Woody Allen's 'Fading Gigolo' Full Of Loneliness And Longing

In the new comedy Fading Gigolo, John Turturro plays the title character, and Woody Allen plays his pimp. This story originally broadcast on All Things Considered on April 18, 2014.
NPR

Soup to Nuts, Restaurants Smoke It All

While you won't find cigarettes in restaurants anymore, some smoking isn't banned. It's not just meat, either; it's hot to smoke just about anything edible.
WAMU 88.5

Virginia Remains At Odds With Feds On Medicaid Expansion

Lawmakers in Virginia continue to resist the $9.6 billion Medicaid expansion on offer from the federal government as part of the Affordable Care Act.

NPR

Watch For The Blind Lets You Feel Time Passing

A new watch allows the blind to feel time on their wrists. Designer Hyungsoo Kim tells NPR's Wade Goodwyn his watch allows users to tell time accurately without revealing their disabilities.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.