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'March For Life' Rally Packs National Mall

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Thousands of pro-life protesters participated in the 37th-annual "March for Life" in D.C.
Patrick Madden
Thousands of pro-life protesters participated in the 37th-annual "March for Life" in D.C.

Thousands of people took part in Monday's "March for Life" rally in Washington. The annual event marks the anniversary of the Supreme Court's Roe v. Wade decision that legalized abortion.

By noon, the National Mall was packed with people. Opponents of abortion rights from all over the country had come to Washington to protest, to march and to hear the speakers.

There were a lot of young people involved -– some 27,000 or so attended Monday morning's youth mass and concert at the Verizon Center. More, it seemed, were at the rally on the Mall and the march to the Supreme Court.

Joey Allaire, a high school student from Rockville, Md., says he appreciated how many young people came to Washington for the march.

"I met a lot of people from a lot of cool places, all over the country," Allaire says. "It's interesting to see just the huge difference of people that are here, just tons of people."

This is the 37th year the March for Life has been held in D.C.

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