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Virginia Teen Returns Home After Being Detained In Kuwait

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Gulet Mohamed arrives at Dulles Airport from Kuwait on Jan. 21.
Jessica Jordan
Gulet Mohamed arrives at Dulles Airport from Kuwait on Jan. 21.

Lawyers of a Virginia teen who returned home Friday after being detained in Kuwait want to know why he was put on a no-fly list.

Gulet Mohamed, 19, is reuniting with his family Friday. He was able to return to the United States Friday morning on a flight to Dulles International Airport.

He says when he got off the flight he was questioned by FBI officials. His attorneys say he was denied the right to have his lawyer present.

Mohamed, a U.S. citizen, says he's lucky to be alive after being tortured in Kuwait and unable to return home.

"I could have been in a hole for six months and nobody would have known anything about me. So there's other Muslims or non-Muslims that are still being tortured and that have been put on the no-fly list, and they're not being charged with anything. We have been harassed," he says.

Mohamed's attorneys say this is an ongoing case. They want the United States to justify why it puts certain people on the no-fly list.

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