WAMU 88.5 : News

Theater Troupe For Home-Schooled Kids Builds Confidence

Play associated audio

By Courtney Collins

A newly formed theater troupe in Lorton, Va., brings musicals to home-schooled children, and they learn a lot more on stage than singing and choreography.

More than 40 children will take the stage Jan. 21 and 22 in a full production of "Willy Wonka Junior." It's not a school musical, and it;s not community theater. Children in the Northern Virginia Players are all home-schooled.

"Home-schooled children don't get the opportunity to participate in theater, so we think this is a very important outlet for them," says Co-Director Kate Wittig.

Wittig says sharing the stage builds confidence and teaches children to depend on each other. Being a part of this production also means social interaction.

Ten-year-old AJ Suess and 9-year-old Jayne Zirkle say their fellow cast members made a great experience even greater.

"It's great to meet new people, have new friends," Suess says.

"Well it's educational first of all, and it promotes good social skills," says Zirkle.

As for the critics who say home-schooled children don't get a well-rounded educational experience, parents say watching just one rehearsal would cure anyone of that prejudice.

NPR

'Rolling The R's' Is A Story About Coming Of Age And Coming Out

Rolling the R's tells the stories of restless teenagers in the disco era in a gritty neighborhood in Hawaii. Author R. Zamora Linmark discusses the book's impact, 20 years after it first came out.
NPR

'Sweetbitter' Is A Savory Saga Of Restaurant Life And Love

Oysters, cocaine, fine wine, love triangles: Stephanie Danler's debut novel Sweetbitter follows a year in the life of a young woman working at a top-tier Manhattan restaurant.
NPR

Trump Rolls Into Washington For Biker Rally

The presumptive Republican nominee for president addressed Rolling Thunder, the annual gathering of motorcyclists, on Sunday. The group seeks to raise awareness of veterans' issues.
NPR

After Breast Cancer Diagnosis, She Channeled Her Ups And Downs Into Texts

NPR's Scott Simon talks with Natalie Sun about her project, textingwithcancer.com. The website won a Webby award, and documents her pessimism and optimism while undergoing chemotherapy.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.