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Washington Area Worst For Traffic Congestion

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A recent study shows that Washington area drivers spend the equivalent of about three full days in traffic per year.
Jessica Jordan
A recent study shows that Washington area drivers spend the equivalent of about three full days in traffic per year.

It is widely known that traffic congestion in the Washington area is bad, but now it appears it's the worst in the nation.

A national traffic survey by the Texas Transportation Institute says Washington area drivers spend 70 hours a year stuck in traffic, which amounts to about three full days. The only other city as bad is Chicago, which shares the dubious top spot with Washington.

D.C. resident Mike Goldberg says he's seen traffic get worse over the years.

"You get on 395 if you're coming up from Woodbridge, it's bumper-to-bumper traffic. And if you're coming from Gaithersburg or Germantown, it's bumper-to-bumper traffic. The Beltway is always very busy and very aggressive," he says.

As a way to cut down on roadway congestion, the American Public Transportation Association is urging Congress to move forward with a plan to expand the use of public transportation.

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