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Virgina Teen Detained In Kuwait Scheduled to Fly Home

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A Virginia teenager who claims he was tortured while being detained in Kuwait is scheduled to return home Friday. The family of 19-year-old Gulet Mohamed says he was first detained and beaten in Kuwait about a month ago and has remained in detention because of his apparent listing on the no-fly list.

This week lawyers from the Council on American-Islamic Relations asked a federal judge to order Mohamed -- an American citizen -- returned to his home.

At a hearing Thursday, government lawyers told the judge the order was unnecessary because the teen is scheduled to fly home Thursday evening, and arrive at Dulles Airport Friday morning.

"Unfortunately, the Justice Department didn't help us in this situation and...we had to file a lawsuit," says Gadeir Abbas, a lawyer for the family.

Abbas says it's still unclear exactly why Mohamed, who had traveled to Yemen on his trip and is of Somali descent, was detained.

"Gulet is just a regular kid, he's got his iPod and his Mac and Carmelo Anthony is his favorite basketball player," Abbas says.

Justice Department representatives declined to comment on the case.

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