WAMU 88.5 : News

Virgina Teen Detained In Kuwait Scheduled to Fly Home

Play associated audio

A Virginia teenager who claims he was tortured while being detained in Kuwait is scheduled to return home Friday. The family of 19-year-old Gulet Mohamed says he was first detained and beaten in Kuwait about a month ago and has remained in detention because of his apparent listing on the no-fly list.

This week lawyers from the Council on American-Islamic Relations asked a federal judge to order Mohamed -- an American citizen -- returned to his home.

At a hearing Thursday, government lawyers told the judge the order was unnecessary because the teen is scheduled to fly home Thursday evening, and arrive at Dulles Airport Friday morning.

"Unfortunately, the Justice Department didn't help us in this situation and...we had to file a lawsuit," says Gadeir Abbas, a lawyer for the family.

Abbas says it's still unclear exactly why Mohamed, who had traveled to Yemen on his trip and is of Somali descent, was detained.

"Gulet is just a regular kid, he's got his iPod and his Mac and Carmelo Anthony is his favorite basketball player," Abbas says.

Justice Department representatives declined to comment on the case.

NPR

'Theeb' Looks At Middle East History Through The Eyes Of A Bedouin Boy

The Oscar-nominated film is set in 1916 Saudi Arabia, a pivotal time in the region. Director Naji Abu Nowar says he wanted to explore "how strange and surreal it must have been" for the Bedouins.
NPR

Beer And Snack Pairings: A Super Bowl Game Everyone Can Win

Which beer goes with guacamole? How can a brew complement spicy wings? Two craft beer experts share their favorite pairings and help us take our Super Bowl snack game to the next level.
NPR

5 Things You Should Know Before the New Hampshire Primary

New Hampshire has a reputation for strong voter participation and independents. It's really easy to get on the ballot, and it has had a better track record of picking GOP nominees in recent years.
NPR

Twitter Says It Has Shut Down 125,000 Terrorism-Related Accounts

The announcement comes just weeks after a woman sued Twitter, saying the platform knowingly let ISIS use the network "to spread propaganda, raise money and attract recruits."

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.