Solar Project Seen As 'Good First Step' Toward Green Energy Movement | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Solar Project Seen As 'Good First Step' Toward Green Energy Movement

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In Maryland, the poultry business ranks as one of the Eastern Shores oldest industries, which is why so many are taking notice of Perdue's recently announced plan to install the largest array of commercially owned solar panels on the East Coast.

Perdue officials say the 11,000 solar panels will stretch over 10 football fields -- producing the equivalent of 4 million gallons of gasoline in clean energy -- and generate more than one-quarter of the electricity at the company.

Some environmentalists are tipping their hat to Perdue, especially since the poultry industry has long been accused of being one of the region's largest polluters.

"Is it perfect? No. Are the solar panels going to change everything? Certainly not, but it's a good first step and it's a good example to lead by," says Dave Wilson, executive director of the Maryland Coastal Bays Program.

Wilson says Perdue has been an industry leader for years as far as striving for environmental awareness, and he says their decision to go solar, marks one of the first and largest stepstowards the green movement by one of the oldest industries on the Eastern Shore.

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