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Holy Cross Wins 'Hospital War' In Montgomery County

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In Maryland, the state's health-care commission has made its decision on whether Holy Cross or Adventist HealthCare will run a hospital in upper Montgomery County. Holy Cross, which already operates a hospital in Silver Spring, was victorious.

The health-care systems have been bitterly competing for more than two years to build a hospital in the area known as the Upcounty, which saw the fastest growth of any area in Montgomery County over the past decade.

Holy Cross plans to build a hospital connected with Montgomery College's Germantown campus. One of the biggest reasons the commission picked Holy Cross was because of their belief that its parent company, Trinity Health, is in better financial shape than Adventist.

Adventist president Bill Robertson all but assured that his company will appeal the decision.

"It is true Trinity is a very large national organization. We're a Maryland organization. This is where we live. This is where we work. And we are financially successful," he says.

Adventist sought to build its hospital in Clarksburg right off of Interstate 270. It would be Adventist's third hospital in Montgomery County and its fourth nationwide. Trinity has hospitals in seven states.

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