First Lady Encourages Student Trips To China | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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First Lady Encourages Student Trips To China

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Wednesday's meeting between President Barak Obama and Chinese President Hu Jintao marks the latest high level meetings between two countries. The first lady, Michelle Obama, is also encouraging American students to get involved in China.

Michelle Obama wants many more students to study and live in China.

"That's how student by student we develop that habit of cooperation," she says.

According to state department officials, in 2009 approximately 13,000 American students studied in China, making it one of the most popular countries.

Over the next four years, Michelle Obama wants to see that number reach 100,000.

"You all are America's true face to the world," she says.

Lyric Carter is a student at Phelps Architecture, Construction and Engineering High School in Northeast D.C. She studied in China for six weeks and says it was the best experience of her life.

"While I was there I did a lot of sketches, and I brought it back to my architecture class and I've done a lot of models from buldings that I've seen in China," Carter says.

And when does she plan to go back? "Soon. Very, very, very soon," Carter says.

The first lady says there are many scholarships available and urged students -- particularly minority and community college students, who are underrepresented in study abroad programs -- to go to China.

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