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Texas Rep.: Congress Members Need Concealed Weapons In D.C.

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After the shooting of Rep. Gabrielle Giffords (D-Ariz.), lawmakers began reexamining their own personal security. Some started carry guns back in their districts, but Texas Republican Rep. Louis Gohmert wants to take it a step further.

Gohmert's crafting a bill to allow lawmakers to conceal weapons once they land in D.C. because he says parts of the city are dangerous.

"We're working on a bill that would allow members of Congress to carry a gun in the District of Columbia. It's a federal enclave. It's set out for in the Constitution to be a district that would be a federal district," Gohmert says.

Northern Virginia Rep. Gerry Connolly (D) says the notion of Gohmert's bill is based on a false premise. He says he doubts the tragedy in Arizona would have been averted if Giffords had a weapon.

"Encouraging shootouts is something that I think puts the public in danger," Connolly says.

Although lawmakers are protected by a large security force while on the Capitol grounds, Gomert worries about their safety once they venture away from the reach of the Capitol Police.

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