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Pr. George's County Police Give Update On 13 Murder Investigations

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In Prince George's County, Md., elected officials and police gathered to talk about the progress they've made in response to the 13 homicides recorded in the county since the start of 2011.

On Tuesday, interim Police Chief Mark Magaw stood with state's attorney, Angela Alsobrooks, and County Executive Rushern Baker, who set the tone of the meeting with this statement: "Violence in Prince George's County will not be tolerated."

Of the 13 killings, 12 are considered criminal homicides and one is being investigated a possible self-defense shooting. Arrests have been made in four cases which have been closed, and local investigators continue to pursue multiple leads in the remaining eight with the help of federal law enforcement.

Magaw says none of this is possible without the ongoing help of anonymous tips from community residents.

"It's critical, for us to fight crime in this community, [that the] community and us be one...[to] be united and have information flow back and forth," he says.

Investigators add the 12 criminal homicides were not random and most likely drug or gang related. Last year police recorded 98 homicides in the county.

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