Islamic Rights Group Wants U.S. Teen Stuck In Kuwait Back Home | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : News

Islamic Rights Group Wants U.S. Teen Stuck In Kuwait Back Home

Play associated audio

A Muslim rights group based in D.C. says the United States is blocking the return of a teenager from Alexandria, Va., who's being held in Kuwait. The U.S. government has not commented on the claim, and the council is considering legal action if it doesn't receive an explanation.

An attorney for the Council on American-Islamic Relations, Gadeir Abbas, says 19-year-old Gulet Mohamed had been overseas for nearly nine months, studying Arabic in Somalia, Yemen and Kuwait. But in December, when he tried to renew his visitor visa for a third time, he was taken by deportation officials.

Abbas says Muhammad's family was eventually advised to purchase the teen a ticket back to the United States, but when he tried to board the flight, he was turned away.

"This is the government deliberately not following clear commands of the law...and depriving an American citizen of really one of the most basic rights that he has: to reside in the United States," he says.

Abbas says the council will file a case in federal district court if it doesn't receive an explanation from the U.S. government.

WAMU 88.5

Art Beat With Lauren Landau, Sept. 18

You can attend an annual Latin American film festival or see a new play about strength, war and family.

NPR

From Coffee To Chicory To Beer, 'Bitter' Flavor Can Be Addictive

If you don't think you like bitter foods, try them again. Jennifer McLagan, the author of Bitter: A Taste of the World's Most Dangerous Flavor, is on a mission to change hearts and minds.
NPR

Senate To Vote On Arming Rebels As Islamic State Seizes Villages

The Islamist rebels reportedly have captured 16 Kurdish villages in northern Syria in a major push for territory. The move has prompted fears of a massacre against civilians.
NPR

3.7 Million Comments Later, Here's Where Net Neutrality Stands

A proposal about how to maintain unfettered access to Internet content drew a bigger public response than any single issue in the Federal Communication Commission's history. What's next?

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.