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(Jan. 17) KING ACROSS THE AGES If you're hoping to celebrate Martin Luther King Jr. Day and want the full package you can count on the Washington National Cathedral, hosting King across the Ages, an all day event of service and soulful music. The service portion gets underway early and the eclectic music performances kick off at 2 p.m.

(Jan. 17) AN MLK DAY FOR THE FAMILY The National Museum of American History marks Dr. King's birthday with an all-encompassing remembrance of the civil rights movement. Interactive plays, exhibits, presentations and discussions provide some historical perspective for the whole family from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday on the National Mall.

(Jan. 18) THE KENNEDY PRESIDENCY, 50 YEARS LATER If MLK Day leaves you yearning for more history The Kennedy Center has you covered with The Presidency of John F. Kennedy: A 50th Anniversary Celebration. The three-week series begins Tuesday and includes performances by the National Symphony Orchestra, Yo-Yo Ma and the American Ballet Theatre.

Music: "Baby Girl" (Instrumental) by The Funk Brothers

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