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'Old Navy Yard'? 'Cream Of Wheaton'? Metro Says Maybe

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Metro's CFO mentioned some station's names could go up for corporate bidding.
David Schultz
Metro's CFO mentioned some station's names could go up for corporate bidding.

The possibility of corporations purchasing the right to name Metro stations has people in the D.C. area talking -- and tweeting.

During her annual budget presentation, Metro CFO Carol Kissal mentioned the possibility that the names of certain Metro stations could be sold to the highest corporate bidder. For a system constantly under financial pressure, she said, this could be an easy way to bring in extra revenue.

Even though the proposal is still in the earliest of stages, with lots more discussion before it could possibly be implemented, that didn't stop the creative minds on Twitter from mobilizing.

Some possible names Tweeters suggested for corporate-sponsored Metro stations: "Old Navy Yard," "Cream of Wheaton" and "West Falls Church's Chicken."

But even if those names do come to pass, they won't solve Metro's budget woes. Kissal estimates selling the naming rights to Metro stations could bring in at most $2 million.

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