WAMU 88.5 : News

'Old Navy Yard'? 'Cream Of Wheaton'? Metro Says Maybe

Play associated audio
Metro's CFO mentioned some station's names could go up for corporate bidding.
David Schultz
Metro's CFO mentioned some station's names could go up for corporate bidding.

The possibility of corporations purchasing the right to name Metro stations has people in the D.C. area talking -- and tweeting.

During her annual budget presentation, Metro CFO Carol Kissal mentioned the possibility that the names of certain Metro stations could be sold to the highest corporate bidder. For a system constantly under financial pressure, she said, this could be an easy way to bring in extra revenue.

Even though the proposal is still in the earliest of stages, with lots more discussion before it could possibly be implemented, that didn't stop the creative minds on Twitter from mobilizing.

Some possible names Tweeters suggested for corporate-sponsored Metro stations: "Old Navy Yard," "Cream of Wheaton" and "West Falls Church's Chicken."

But even if those names do come to pass, they won't solve Metro's budget woes. Kissal estimates selling the naming rights to Metro stations could bring in at most $2 million.


From Trembling Teacher To Seasoned Mentor: How Tim Gunn Made It Work

Gunn, the mentor to young designers on Project Runway, has been a teacher and educator for decades. But he spent his childhood "absolutely hating, hating, hating, hating school," he says.

How Do We Get To Love At 'First Bite'?

It's the season of food, and British food writer Bee Wilson has a book on how our food tastes are formed. NPR's Scott Simon speaks with her about her new book, "First Bite: How We Learn to Eat."

Osceola At The 50-Yard Line

The Seminole Tribe of Florida works with Florida State University to ensure it that its football team accurately presents Seminole traditions and imagery.

Payoffs For Prediction: Could Markets Help Identify Terrorism Risk?

In a terror prediction market, people would be real money on the likelihood of attacks. NPR's Scott Simon speaks with Stephen Carter about whether such a market could predict — and deter — attacks.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.