Ocean City Officials Deny Resident's Wind Turbine Project | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Ocean City Officials Deny Resident's Wind Turbine Project

Play associated audio

In Ocean City, Md., the founder of the world's largest billfish tournament has had his quest to install a 39-foot wind turbine on his bay-front property turned down -- despite a law that allows it.

White Marlin Open founder Jim Motsko was the most prominent voice calling for the mayor and city council to pass a law last year allowing wind turbines to be built in Ocean City, which is why he was so surprised and angered when the council denied his proposal.

"I think [they want to] just to make themselves look like they are going green, and they aren't going green," Motsko says.

Motsko's application was the resort's first, and he's spent more than $5,000 in planning fees just to get to this point.

He says he believes complaints from one of his neighbors that the turbines will block their bay views is just one of the factors that led to his efforts being stymied. The other, Motsko says, is the council's refusal to change one word in the law so he can meet the setback requirements.

"I can build a 45-foot-tall building 10 feet from my property line, but I can't put up a turbine," Motsko says. "It absolutely makes no sense."

Motsko says he still wants to reduce his carbon footprint, but he's unsure how to persuade the council to change their views.

NPR

Maria Leaves Sesame Street After 44 Years On The Block

Sonia Manzano's acting career began when she was in the original cast of Godspell – a musical which began as a student production on campus, according to the Associated Press.
NPR

Do Organic Farmers Need Special Seeds And Money To Breed Them?

Organic farmers say they need crop varieties that were bred specifically for conditions on their farms. Clif Bar & Company decided to back their cause with up to $10 million in grants.
NPR

Small Donors Fueled Sanders' $15 Million Fundraising Haul

The Sanders campaign said its average contribution was $33.51, but reliance on small donors cuts both ways.
NPR

How Salt + Car Battery = Clean Water

A clever device uses technology developed by the military to make chlorine quickly and cheaply. The goal is to give schools and hospitals around the world an easy way to purify water.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.