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Muslim Group Aims To Reject Violence, Embrace Peace Via Ads

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The overall goal of the "Muslims for Loyalty" ad campaign is to create a trend which discourages homegrown terrorism. The faith-based initiative, being launched in the District and eventually nationwide, is sponsored by the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community.

The group's national vice president, Naseem Mahdi, says this notion is one of the basic teachings of Islam.

"A terrorist cannot be a Muslim, because...the word Islam means peace...As the Quran and the Prophet Muhammad, peace be upon him, says that you should be obedient and loyal to the countries where you live. To those people who are in authority, you should be loyal. So this is our religious responsibility," he says.

Army Major Jallal Malik, who was raised in the U.S., says he agrees the solution is in faith.

"...You've got to counter this negative -- no terrorism and all that kind of thing -- but at the same time...in my opinion, the focus needs to be a lot more on the positive message, what the positive messages of the holy Quran are," Malik says.

The ad campaign will appear on buses and billboards across the U.S later this year.

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