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Homeless Rate Surges In Maryland During Recession

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Homelessness has spiked across the region during the recession. But few places were hit as hard as Maryland.

From 2008 to 2009, the number of homeless Maryland residents jumped by more than 25 percent, according a report out Wednesday by the National Alliance to End Homelessness.

The number of chronically homeless in Maryland jumped by more than one-third, as did the number of unsheltered homeless people.

The report suggests the state's high foreclosure rate and housing costs played a role in these increases.

By comparison, the District fared better. Its homeless population increased by 3 percent, just below the reports national average.

The number of chronically homeless in D.C. decreased by 12 percent. The Alliance's CEO, Nan Roman, credits the District government for pursuing policies like permanent supportive housing -- a new approach that focuses on moving chronically homeless people into housing and surrounding them with wrap-around services.


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