WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Pr. George's County Executive Tackles Spike In Homicides

Play associated audio

There have been nine homicides in Prince George's County, Md., in the first nine days of the New Year. County Executive Rushern Baker says he's working with local police to end the violence.

But first, you might ask why so many murders in such a short space of time. Baker says he put the same question to interim Police Chief Mark Magaw.

"...[Magaw] said this happens...at the New Year, you have turf battles that go on and so things of this nature happen," Baker says.

To address the problem, county law officials plan to execute a sizable shift of detectives to divisions which handle high crime investigation and drug enforcement. Others will be moved to a federal task force formed to help curb the string of violence.

According to Baker, county police know who to target.

"These are not unrelated crimes. A lot of these have to do with gang activity that we're looking at, drug related crimes, and so our thing right now is to make sure we close them, but more importantly that we put the people out in the street to try our best to make sure this doesn't happen," he says.

Investigators say the spike in homicides does not necessarily forecast a trend for the year.

NPR

Woody Allen's 'Fading Gigolo' Full Of Loneliness And Longing

In the new comedy Fading Gigolo, John Turturro plays the title character, and Woody Allen plays his pimp. This story originally broadcast on All Things Considered on April 18, 2014.
NPR

Soup to Nuts, Restaurants Smoke It All

While you won't find cigarettes in restaurants anymore, some smoking isn't banned. It's not just meat, either; it's hot to smoke just about anything edible.
WAMU 88.5

Virginia Remains At Odds With Feds On Medicaid Expansion

Lawmakers in Virginia continue to resist the $9.6 billion Medicaid expansion on offer from the federal government as part of the Affordable Care Act.

NPR

Watch For The Blind Lets You Feel Time Passing

A new watch allows the blind to feel time on their wrists. Designer Hyungsoo Kim tells NPR's Wade Goodwyn his watch allows users to tell time accurately without revealing their disabilities.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.