'Art Beat' With Sean Rameswaram | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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'Art Beat' With Sean Rameswaram

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(Jan. 11-March 13) THE NARCISSISM OF MINOR DIFFERENCES The Narcissism of Minor Differences corrals art, documentation and historical artifacts to explore intolerance at the Maryland Institute College of Art in Baltimore through mid-March. Works by Francisco de Goya, Philip Guston and Sam Durant depict prejudice in its most benign and overt manifestations.

(Jan. 11-Feb. 4) IN-FLUX & EFFLUX The gallery at Northwest Washington's Smith Farm Center is under construction, but that hasn't stopped a group of eager artists from presenting their work. If you're ambling by on U Street, you'll see IN-FLUX, window dressing that examines transitions and rebirth. And if you step in, there's Efflux -- a sprawling, site-specific and self-aware drawing that moves the viewer through its own creation, existence and destruction.

(Jan. 13) THEM ANTS! The Mall's Smithsonian American Art Museum is screening sci-fi films to amplify themes found in Alexis Rockman's ongoing "Fable for Tomorrow" exhibition. On Thursday night it's Them!, in which nuclear tests go real bad and giant ants get real mad.

Music: "Gotta Be Something" [Instrumental] by D-Tension

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