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Small Vigil Held At U.S. Capitol For Victims Of Tucson Shooting

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A small group of people braved the cold weather Sunday evening to hold candlelight vigil for Arizona Rep. Gabrielle Giffords on the steps of the Capitol.

With the flag atop the Capitol flying at half-staff, below on the front steps, a small group of strangers huddled together in a tight circle.

Holding small candles that kept blowing out, some shared their reactions to the tragedy.

"I was very sad, just devastated," says Sarah Wendell, a Tuscon native who now lives in D.C. "My family lives two blocks away from the Safeway, and I grew up in that neighborhood, and it's just extremely sad."

There were others: a few couples, a Vietnam veteran holding a sign that read "the madness must stop."

George Washington University student Madeline Marquez worked in Gifford's office in Tuscon and in D.C. She remembered Gabe Zimmerman, Gifford's aide who was killed in the shooting.

"[When I heard about Gabe] it really, really upset me because when I first came to D.C he was the one who...told me what paintings to look at in the Capitol and things like that," Marquez says. "So it was really hard."

President Obama has called for a national moment of silence beginning at 11 a.m. Monday to honor victims of the Arizona shootings.

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