Capitol Hill Abuzz With Safety Concerns | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Capitol Hill Abuzz With Safety Concerns

Play associated audio

Some of the region's lawmakers say more security may not be the answer to this weekend's attack on Rep. Gabrielle Giffords. Many lawmakers and their families are asking themselves if they're safe.

Immediately after Saturday's shooting some lawmakers increased their own security. And on Sunday the sergeant at arms and the chief of the Capitol Police were on a call for concerned lawmakers, family members and staffers; approximately 800 people conferenced in. Some members are already calling for more funds for personal security when they're back in their districts.

But Maryland Democrat Rep. Chris Van Hollen says he's waiting to hear recommendations from the Capitol Police.

"While there will be a heightened sense of the need to take precaution, I believe, most of us will continue to go about our days meeting with constituents and being out and about and being as accessible as possible," Van Hollen says.

On Wednesday Congress will have a special joint conference on security for lawmakers. Safety recommendations will be distributed.

NBC4 video on Capitol Hill safety concerns:

View more news videos at: http://www.nbcwashington.com/video.

WAMU 88.5

A Conversation With American Ballet Theatre's Misty Copeland (Rebroadcast)

Acclaimed ballerina Misty Copeland joined Diane to talk about her remarkable career and how she is challenging physical stereotypes that she says keep ballet stuck in the past.

NPR

New Nation, New Cuisine: The First Cookbook To Tackle 'American Food'

The first American cookbook, published in 1796, promised local food and a kind of socioculinary equality.
WAMU 88.5

Danielle Allen: "Our Declaration" (Rebroadcast)

For the Fourth of July: A fresh reading of the Declaration of Independence, and how ideas of freedom and equality have been interpreted over the years.

NPR

How Personal Should A Personal Assistant Get? Google And Apple Disagree

When you're buying a smartphone, chances are you don't dig too deeply into the personal assistant. Google aims to change that — and in the process, it's testing our appetite for privacy in a big way.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.