Capitol Hill Abuzz With Safety Concerns | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Capitol Hill Abuzz With Safety Concerns

Play associated audio

Some of the region's lawmakers say more security may not be the answer to this weekend's attack on Rep. Gabrielle Giffords. Many lawmakers and their families are asking themselves if they're safe.

Immediately after Saturday's shooting some lawmakers increased their own security. And on Sunday the sergeant at arms and the chief of the Capitol Police were on a call for concerned lawmakers, family members and staffers; approximately 800 people conferenced in. Some members are already calling for more funds for personal security when they're back in their districts.

But Maryland Democrat Rep. Chris Van Hollen says he's waiting to hear recommendations from the Capitol Police.

"While there will be a heightened sense of the need to take precaution, I believe, most of us will continue to go about our days meeting with constituents and being out and about and being as accessible as possible," Van Hollen says.

On Wednesday Congress will have a special joint conference on security for lawmakers. Safety recommendations will be distributed.

NBC4 video on Capitol Hill safety concerns:

View more news videos at: http://www.nbcwashington.com/video.

NPR

The Dread Factor: Why Ebola And 'Contagion' Scare Us So Much

Even just the word Ebola is kind of terrifying. Why? Hollywood has a lot to do with it. But Ebola outbreaks also have all the ingredients for what one psychologist calls the "dread factor."
NPR

Author And His Daughter Cook Around The World And You Can Too

Kelly McEvers talks to food writer Mark Kurlansky and his daughter Talia about their cookbook International Night, based on their tradition of cooking a meal every week from a different country.
NPR

Outside Group Mirrors Successful Strategies Of Political Parties

A U.S. Senate seat is up for grabs in Iowa, and the GOP has opened 11 field offices statewide. But there's also a new team working the state, the Virginia-based group Americans for Prosperity.
NPR

Who Owns A Monkey's Selfie? No One Can, U.S. Says

The U.S. Copyright Office says a monkey's photo can't be copyrighted — by the person who owns the camera or anyone else — because it wasn't taken by a human.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.