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Investigation Continues Into Incendiary Devices

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Postal facilities and law enforcement throughout the region are on alert as the investigation continues into incendiary devices that have gone off in mail rooms and processing centers in Maryland and D.C. over the past two days.

The third incendiary device, found in a postal facility on V Street Northeast, went off on Friday afternoon. It was addressed to Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano. It followed two similar incidents in Maryland on Thursday, those packages were addressed to Maryland Governor Martin O'Malley and the state's Secretary of Transportation. There were no serious inuries reported. Pete Rendina is D.C.'s Assistant U.S. Postal Inspector.

"We have postal inspectors screening mail through our processing facilities, and we've talked to our postal employees about suspicious characteristics to look for," he says.

Those measures, however, didn't prevent the third package from being identified before it went off. Law enforcement officials say a significant amount of physical evidence has been collected and DNA analysis is likely. There are currently no suspects.

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