WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Investigation Continues Into Incendiary Devices

Play associated audio

Postal facilities and law enforcement throughout the region are on alert as the investigation continues into incendiary devices that have gone off in mail rooms and processing centers in Maryland and D.C. over the past two days.

The third incendiary device, found in a postal facility on V Street Northeast, went off on Friday afternoon. It was addressed to Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano. It followed two similar incidents in Maryland on Thursday, those packages were addressed to Maryland Governor Martin O'Malley and the state's Secretary of Transportation. There were no serious inuries reported. Pete Rendina is D.C.'s Assistant U.S. Postal Inspector.

"We have postal inspectors screening mail through our processing facilities, and we've talked to our postal employees about suspicious characteristics to look for," he says.

Those measures, however, didn't prevent the third package from being identified before it went off. Law enforcement officials say a significant amount of physical evidence has been collected and DNA analysis is likely. There are currently no suspects.


French Bulldog At Heart Of New Children's Book 'Naughty Mabel'

Mabel is a naughty French bulldog at the center of a new children's book by Nathan Lane and Devlin Elliott. NPR's Scott Simon speaks with Lane about his inspiration for the fictional dog.

How Do We Get To Love At 'First Bite'?

It's the season of food, and British food writer Bee Wilson has a book on how our food tastes are formed. NPR's Scott Simon speaks with her about her new book, "First Bite: How We Learn to Eat."

Snapshots 2016: Trump's Message Resonates With A Master Cabinet Maker

From time to time during this election season we'll be introducing you to ordinary people that our reporters meet out on the campaign trail. Today: a snapshot from a Donald Trump rally in New Hampshire.

What Is Li-Fi And When Will You Use It To Download Everything Faster?

Li-Fi is a lot like Wi-Fi, but it uses light to transmit data. NPR's Scott Simon speaks to the man who invented the faster alternative: Harald Haas.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.