The YMCA And Giant Team Up To Fight Chronic Obesity | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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The YMCA And Giant Team Up To Fight Chronic Obesity

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By Courtney Collins

A healthy living partnership has been launched between Giant Food and the YMCA of Metropolitan Washington.

Giant Food and the YMCA say they are thrilled to be partnering in the name of good health. Unfortunately, the circumstances surrounding their union are grim. According to Angie Reese-Hawkins, president of the YMCA of Metropolitan Washington, the current generation of kids is headed for obesity, diabetes and other chronic conditions.

"Very specifically, this has an impact on our future, and I think kids deserve a fighting chance, and they're not going to have one," Reese-Hawkins says. "In fact, statistics will show that this is the first...group of kids that are not going to outlive us."

The partnership will focus on education. A healthy snack program will be implemented and parents will learn how to make good choices when they cook and shop. The YMCA mobile playground will also be making the rounds at metropolitan area Giants.

Giant also donated $50,000 to put healthy snack food in local YMCAs.

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