Origins Of Incendiary Packages Opened In Md. Still Unknown | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Origins Of Incendiary Packages Opened In Md. Still Unknown

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U.S. postal inspectors are trying to track the origin of incendiary packages sent to Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley and the state's transportation secretary Thursday.

Postal Inspector Frank Schissler of the Washington field division says there were exterior markings on the packages that will help investigators narrow down their origin. But he says the packages didn't have individual tracking numbers because they weren't sent via registered mail or express mail.

The packages produced smoke and small flames when they were opened by state workers Thursday afternoon, but no one was seriously injured. Authorities say both packages contained notes railing against highway signs urging motorists to "Report Suspicious Activity."

Schissler says packages are tracked once they enter mail processing plants, and he says the postal service will examiner its internal tracking data on the packages.

Schissler also said that DNA analysis was likely.


View Suspicious Packages In Md. State Buildings in a larger map
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