WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Governor's Is Not The Last Word On Teacher Pensions In Md.

Play associated audio

In Maryland, many local leaders are happy with Gov. Martin O'Malley's pledge to not share the burden of teacher pensions between the state and county governments, a move that was looked at to help close Maryland's budget deficit.

While O'Malley says he will not push to share pensions, he did tell a gathering of the Maryland Association of Counties he sees the argument behind doing so.

"There is no privity of contract between the teachers' contracts that they make with their school boards, and the state of Maryland that is funding 100 percent of these costs," he says.

Senate president Mike Miller is one of the biggest supporters of sharing pensions for that reason. But local politicians like Montgomery County council member Phil Andrews say legislators are to blame for rising pension costs, even though the state has no hand in negotiating the contracts with teachers.

"It is the general assembly that increased the pension benefit by 29 percent in an election year, 2006, and made it retroactive by eight years. And that clearly contributed to what has gone on since," Andrews says.

Sharing pensions would explode budget deficits facing local governments. In Montgomery County, it could increase a $300 million deficit by over $80 million.

WAMU 88.5

Art Beat With Lauren Landau, April 24

You can see a creative dance group perform a physical ode to the natural world or check out an indie-soul singer who uses music to pay tribute to her roots.
NPR

Obama Gets A Taste Of Jiro's 'Dream' Sushi In Name Of Diplomacy

On the first leg of his Asian tour, the president stopped by the iconic sushi restaurant. David Gelb, who directed a documentary about the restaurant, says eating there is amazing and nerve-wracking.
WAMU 88.5

Environmentalists Turn To Campaign Finance Reform To Advance Cause

Frustrated by the lobbying power of oil and gas companies, environmenalists are joining the call for campaign finance reform in Washington.

NPR

FCC Set To Change Net Neutrality Rules

On Thursday, the chairman of the Federal Communications Commission will propose new rules for how broadband providers should treat the Internet traffic flowing through their networks.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.