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Residents Get A Chance To Voice Concerns To Pepco

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Pepco's response to power outages caused by storms has been the cause of much criticism. Now, people in Maryland's Montgomery County are getting a chance to let tell a county work group what they think about the utility.

Members of the work group want to get a pulse on just how satisfied or dissatisfied residents have been with Pepco's service.

Over the summer, hundreds of thousands of people in the District and Maryland were without power after multiple storms downed hundreds of power lines. Customers complained that Pepco's response was sluggish and many say it was impossible to reach Pepco phone operators during the outages.

Following the outcry, in October County Executive Isiah Leggett created a work group made up of community leaders to investigate the power company's poor service reliability throughout the county.

When the group wraps up its work, Leggett will present the final recommendations to Pepco and to the Maryland Public Service Commission.

Wednesday's hearing will be held at 6:30 p.m. at the Council Office Building in Rockville. Speaker sign-up will be first-come-first served and registration will be limited to 50 people.

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