D.C. Delegate Loses Voting Rights | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : News

D.C. Delegate Loses Voting Rights

Play associated audio

Rules adopted Wednesday to govern the House of Representatives take away the limited floor voting rights of six delegates -- including that of D.C's delegate, Eleanor Holmes Norton.

The GOP's decision to rescind the ability of delegates to vote on amendments on the House floor was not surprising.

Democrats extended those voting rights in 1993 when they controlled the House. Republicans eliminated them when they took the majority in 1995, and Democrats restored delegate rights when they regained control in 2007.

In anticipation of the latest Republican move, District leaders protested on Capitol Hill Tuesday. And Wednesday Norton tried another tactic: She offered a motion to set up a special committee to study the delegate voting issue.

It was defeated on a party-line vote.

The other delegates affected by the new rules represent Puerto Rico, Guam, American Samoa and the Northern Mariana Islands. Those delegates represent more than 4 million constituents.

NPR

The World Music Education of Philip Glass

In his new memoir, Music Without Words, the composer explains how a chance meeting with Ravi Shankar sparked a fascination with the cultures of the world and their music.
NPR

PepsiCo Swaps Diet Drink's Aspartame For Other Artificial Sweeteners

The company says Diet Pepsi consumers are concerned about aspartame. But the Food and Drug Administration has long affirmed that the sweetener is safe in amounts commonly used by beverage companies.
NPR

8 Obama Jokes That Stood Out From The White House Correspondents Dinner

Every year, the president sits down for dinner with Washington reporters and delivers a standup routine. From his "bucket list" to Hillary Clinton, here's what he came up with this year.
NPR

As Health Apps Hop On The Apple Watch, Privacy Will Be Key

The notion of receiving nutrition advice from artificial intelligence on your wrist may seem like science fiction. But health developers are betting this kind of behavior will become the norm.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.