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'Art Beat' With Sean Rameswaram

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(Jan. 5) JULIE DEXTER DOES BLUES British vocalist Julie Dexter brings a powerful set of pipes to Georgetown's Blues Alley Wednesday night. The classically trained composer seamlessly samples neo-soul, bossa nova, reggae, and afrobeat at 8 p.m. and again at 10 p.m.

(Jan. 5-30) OFF-KILTER COLORS Washington's Touchstone Gallery opens Off-Kilter Wednesday. The exhibit features the unbalanced artworks of local painter Leslie Nolan, whose over-saturated acrylic depictions of humans attempt to relate the energy and instability of modern life.

(Jan. 5) BLANK SPACE, OPEN HOUSE Blank Space SE is a pop-up gallery that provides temporary space to creative folks in need of a showcase and Wednesday’s Open House fits the bill to perfection: Washington's Critical Exposure hosts a one-day exhibition of youth photography with dance and music courtesy of D.C.'s Urban Artistry collective.

Music: "Afternoon Speaker" by The Sea And Cake

NPR

Encore: 'Future Shock' 40 Years Later

Future Shock by Alvin Toffler was a huge sensation when it was published in 1970. The book perfectly captured the angst of that time and prepared society for more changes to come.
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The yogurt entrepreneur who set fire to his factory remains in prison, but he's in better spirits now. "He's dreaming again," says his wife.
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Prohibition-Era Gang Violence Prompted Congress To Act On Gun Control

In the 1930s, the United States government was absorbed with a different kind of gun violence: prohibition-era gangsters using fully automatic weapons of war, with civilians often caught in the crossfire. NPR looks back at how the U.S. Congress, at the urging of President Franklin D. Roosevelt, passed the nation's first firearms legislation, which still holds today.
NPR

'Future Shock' Author Alvin Toffler Dies at 87

Toffler's warnings about 'information overload' and the accelerating pace of change in modern society made his seminal 1970 book a best-seller in the U.S. and around the world.

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