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Residents Cross Fingers For Mega Millions Jackpot

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The clock is ticking down to the drawing of the Mega Millions Jackpot worth an estimated $330 million.

Residents in the D.C. metro area are scrambling to buy tickets.

"Since 6 o'clock, we started at 6 and already people came in," says Lucy Pah, owner of Tenley Wine and Liquor.

Pah mans a noisy register as customers flood her store.

She's selling ticket after ticket for the Mega Million drawing Tuesday night.

"I'm buying like $2 in Maryland, $2 in D.C., $2 in Virginia," one customer says.

While some customers bank on strategy, others like Michelle Lee, are thinking ahead to the possibilities of a win.

"Actually, I'm gonna put it to good use with a charity and all that stuff, so I have good plans for it," Lee says.

The cash option is a staggering $208.3 million or $12.6 million a year for 26 years.

Dawn Ellis says that's enough to ease her financial burdens for a lifetime.

"Pay off my bills, invest in my kid's college fund, and probably move closer to my parents," Ellis says.

Tickets for the Mega Millions game are $1 a piece.

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