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WASHINGTON (AP) Washington Mayor Vincent Gray and advocates for the city are protesting a Republican plan to take away power from the District's sole representative in Congress. Today, Gray and Washington's delegate to Congress Eleanor Holmes Norton joined the advocacy group D.C. Vote on Capitol Hill to protest the new rules.

WASHINGTON (AP) With more than $300 million in unpaid parking and driving tickets, the District of Columbia may offer an amnesty program to help collect those fines and close the city's budget gap. Under the plan, the Department of Motor Vehicles would waive all penalties on delinquent tickets and collect the original fines.

WASHINGTON (AP) An elderly bald eagle has been euthanized at the Smithsonian's National Zoo after falling ill. The eagle named Sam was euthanized Friday. She was found lying in her exhibit last Tuesday.

WASHINGTON (AP) Ford's Theatre says it has raised more than $77,000 from theatergoers during the holiday season for the charity So Others Might Eat. The theater ran a donation drive during curtain calls after productions of "A Christmas Carol" between November 20th and December 29th.

(Copyright 2011 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)

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