WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

D.C. Welcomes New Class Of Commissioners

Play associated audio

By Jessica Gould

Critics say Washington is home to Big Government. But it's also home to some of the nation's smallest governments. In addition to the new mayor, hundreds of D.C.'s not-so-well-known elected officials are taking the helm of Advisory Neighborhood Commissions.

Gottlieb Simon is executive director of D.C.'s Office of Advisory Neighborhood Commissions.

"[The commissions] advise all parts of the District government on issues that have impact and importance for the neighborhood such as liquor licenses, zoning applications, things of that sort," he says.

Mike Silverstein joined the Dupont Circle commission eight years ago after someone was shot and killed outside his window. He says he wanted to improve the community and participate in the political process.

"Someone in the '60s described Washington as a city of eunuchs. Government and politics are all around us. And for most of us this is the one opportunity that we have to participate in the game," he says.

The commissions emerged in the mid-1970s as part of the District's Home Rule charter. There are 37 commissions throughout the city.


No Meekness Here: Meet Rosa Parks, 'Lifelong Freedom Fighter'

As the 60th anniversary of the historic Montgomery Bus Boycott approaches, author Jeanne Theoharis says it's time to let go of the image of Rosa Parks as an unassuming accidental activist.

Internet Food Culture Gives Rise To New 'Eatymology'

Internet food culture has brought us new words for nearly every gastronomical condition. The author of "Eatymology," parodist Josh Friedland, discusses "brogurt" with NPR's Rachel Martin.
WAMU 88.5

World Leaders Meet For The UN Climate Change Summit In Paris

World leaders meet for the UN climate change summit in Paris to discuss plans for reducing carbon emissions. What's at stake for the talks, and prospects for a major agreement.


Payoffs For Prediction: Could Markets Help Identify Terrorism Risk?

In a terror prediction market, people would bet real money on the likelihood of attacks. NPR's Scott Simon speaks with Stephen Carter about whether such a market could predict — and deter — attacks.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.