'Art Beat' With Sean Rameswaram | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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'Art Beat' With Sean Rameswaram

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(Jan. 3-31) REEL INJUN The National Museum of the American Indian welcomes 2011 with a look back at how native peoples have been portrayed in Hollywood. Reel Injun: On The Trail of the Hollywood Indian explores how the film industry has furthered the understanding and misunderstanding of American Indians from the silent era to today. You can catch the documentary through the end of January on the National Mall.

(Jan. 5) SLAVES IN THEIR BONDS In keeping with tradition, Washington's Avalon Theatre screens a Greek film on the first Wednesday of each month. This week it's 2009's Slaves in Their Bonds. Set on an idyllic Greek island in the early 20th century, it's the story of a noble family that falls apart after a string of lethal love affairs.

(Jan. 3-30) NOT JUST A BUNCH OF SQUARES A World of Color: Fabric Art showcases the work of Cloth and Conversation, a group of quilters who eschew the squares and utilitarian quilts of yore for pictorial and artistic designs. You can appreciate Fabric Art at the River Road Unitarian Gallery in Bethesda through late January.

Music: "Melancholy Hill" (Instrumental) by Gorillaz

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