D.C. Voting Rights Activists To Protest G.O.P Move | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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D.C. Voting Rights Activists To Protest G.O.P Move

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D.C. Voting rights activists are protesting the plan to strip D.C. Delegate Eleanor Holmes Norton of her limited voting power.

Under the Democrats control of Congress, Norton and delegates from other U.S. territories like Guam and Puerto Rico have been allowed to cast floor votes when the chamber was meeting as a Committee of the Whole.

This allowed Norton to weigh in on a number of issues -- although it is limited, a vote could not count if it was a deciding one.

But when the Republicans officially take over the house next week, they are planning to strip delegates of this power.

The group DC Vote says its bringing volunteers to Capitol Hill next Tuesday to protest the move.

"We are going to try and visit every house office that day," says Ilir Zherka, Executive Director of DC Vote. "We are going to have people call in to Speaker-designate John Boehners office and make sure D.C. residents communicate their views with him.

Zherka says hes hoping the city's incoming mayor, Vincent Gray, and other city leaders will join the activists at the U.S. Capital next week.

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