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'Art Beat' With Sean Rameswaram

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(Dec. 30) SECOND CITY IN CHARM CITY Charm City gets some laughs courtesy of Second City Thursday night through late February. Chicago's seminal improvisational comedy institution has churned out some of the biggest names in laughter. They bring a Baltimore-specific production to Center Stage on North Calvert Street.

(Dec. 31) NYE@KC If you're ready to ring in 2011, but still lacking the right place for the celebration, there's New Year's Eve at the Kennedy Center Friday at 8:30 p.m. For the 16th year, The Kennedy Center switches out calendars with classical compositions courtesy of the National Symphony Orchestra and some dancing in the grand foyer well into the morning.

(Dec. 30-Jan. 9) MYSTERY MOUSTRAP If you like to close out the year or begin new ones with mystery, there's "The Mousetrap" at 1st Stage in McLean, Va., through Jan. 9. All the usual ingredients are present in Agatha Christie's whodunit: a well-intentioned couple with a guesthouse, a number of guests, a crippling storm and a murder.

Music: "Boyd's Journey" by Damon Albarn and Michael Nyman

NPR

'The Terror Years' Traces The Rise Of Al-Qaida And ISIS

Lawrence Wright's new book collects his essays for The New Yorker on the growth of terrorism in the Middle East, from the Sept. 11 attacks to the recent beheadings of journalists and aid workers.
NPR

Berkeley's Soda Tax Appears To Cut Consumption Of Sugary Drinks

According to a new study, the nation's first soda tax succeeded in cutting consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages. But there's uncertainty about whether the effect will be permanent.
WAMU 88.5

Questions About Hillary Clinton’s Newly Uncovered Emails

A federal judge orders a review of nearly fifteen thousand recently discovered Hillary Clinton emails from her time as Secretary of State. A new batch related to the Clinton Foundation was also released. Join us to discuss ongoing questions.

NPR

Instagramming In Black And White? Could Be You're Depressed

Researchers analyzed people's photo galleries on Instagram, then asked about their mental health. People who favored darker, grayer photos and filters were more likely to be depressed.

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