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D.C. Delegate Reflects On 2010, Anticipates Future Battles

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D.C. Delegate Eleanor Holmes Norton says she wants to maintain momentum for voting rights.
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D.C. Delegate Eleanor Holmes Norton says she wants to maintain momentum for voting rights.

D.C.'s delegate, Eleanor Holmes Norton, says she's made the "maximum use" of four years of Democratic control. Now she says the challenge is to protect those gains until the elections in 2012.

Looking back, Norton lists several accomplishments for 2010. They include: construction jobs for D.C. residents at the Department of Homeland Security headquarters being built in Southeast D.C., a continuance of the homebuyer and business tax credits and requiring the government to pay for stormwater runoff costs from federal buildings.

In 2011, Norton says she wants to protect the District from what she calls "interference from Congress" and continue to push for voting rights.

"I want to preseve the momentum we have for voting rights because by 2012 I think we'll have a different Congress because we'll have a full-bodied election at that time," she says.

But even as Norton is trying to get voting rights for all, she's also trying to hang on to her own vote. Norton is allowed to vote on amendments to tax and spending bills as part of the Committee of the Whole. But she says she expects that vote to be taken away when a more conservative Congress takes office.

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