'Art Beat' With Sean Rameswaram | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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'Art Beat' With Sean Rameswaram

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(Dec. 29-30) MONTY ALEXANDER Monty Alexander tickles the ivories Wednesday and Thursday night at Blues Alley in Georgetown. In his 40-year career, Alexander has performed with everyone from Dizzy Gillespie to Quincy Jones. The piano man fuses the traditions of American Jazz with the music of his native Jamaica.

(Dec. 29-Jan. 7) MADE IN DAGENHAM When you think of 1960s revolutionaries, a coterie of feisty factory girls from Dagenham, England, may not immediately come to mind, but that could change after you see "Made in Dagenham", screening now at Washington's E Street Cinema. The film follows the working-class women from the London suburb's Ford factory as they fight for equal pay and rights.

(Dec. 29-Jan. 16) RISE AND FALL Photographer Fiona Tan concerns herself with memory -- namely how unreliable our recollections can be. Her images explore the space between subjective remembrance and factual record. "Rise and Fall" showcases the Indonesian-born artist's work through mid-January at the Sackler Gallery on the National Mall.

Music: "Bag's Boogie" by Dizzy Gillespie

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